Category Archives: Articles of Interest

Guide To Glues

 

 

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Glue Types and Information

Adhesive
Dries:
Time:
Works with:
Did you know?

Acid-Free Tape
Clear
Instant
Fabric, foam, paper, and wood.
This tape has a red peel-away liner for easier use.

Apoxie® Paste
Slightly translucent
1 – 3 hour working time. Fully cures after 24 hours
Foam, wood, stone, ceramics, metal, rhinestones and cabochons.
This waterproof paste can be tinted to match your designs.

Apoxie Sculpt
Opaque
1 – 3 hour working time. Fully cures after 24 hours.
Wood, plastic, stone, glass, metal, rhinestones and cabochons.
This moldable adhesive is great for use in pavé designs.

Araldite®
Very light ivory color
90 minutes
Fabric, foam, paper, wood, plastic (except for polyethylene, polypropylene and Teflon®), stone, glass, ceramics, metal, rhinestones and cabochons.
This two-part epoxy provides you with a waterproof connection.

Bond-A-Dot
An opaque fabric-like material
Instant
Wood, stone, glass, ceramics, metal, rhinestones without foil backing and cabochons.
These dots can be cut to the size you need.

Devcon® 5 Minute® 2-part Epoxy
Clear
5 minutes
Wood, stone, glass, ceramics, metal, rhinestones and cabochons.
Mixing the equal parts is easier because of the syringe packaging.

Devcon 2 Ton® Clear, 30-minute, 2-part Epoxy
Clear
30 minutes
Wood, stone, glass, ceramics, metal, rhinestones and cabochons.
This is as strong as the 5-minute version, but allows more working time.

E-6000® Extreme
Clear
Dries in 8 hours. Washable after 72 hours.
Fabric, paper and wood.
This glue lets you create repositionable dots of adhesive.

E-6000 Fabri-Fuse
Clear
Dries in 8 hours. Washable after 72 hours.
Fabric
This glue is very stretchable even when dry!

E-6000 Fray Lock
Crystal clear
Dries in 2 to 5 hours. Washable in 72 hours.
Fabric
This is great for locking in knots, quilting and more.

E-6000 Stitchless
Clear
Sets in 60 seconds. Washable in 72 hours.
Fabric
This glue lets you use your iron to quickly “sew” hems.

E-6000 Jewelry and Bead™
Clear
24 to 72 hours
Fabric, stone, glass and metal.
Because this glue is flexible once dry, it makes a great choice for securing knots.

E-6000 Jewelry and Craft Adhesive
Cloudy
Sets in about 10 minutes. Fully cured in 24 to 72 hours.
Fabric, wood, stone, glass, ceramics, metal and rhinestones without foil backing.
Flexibility when this glue dries helps to make sure it won’t crack with movement.

E-6000 Jewelry and Craft Adhesive White
Opaque white
Sets in about 10 minutes. Fully cured in 24 to 72 hours.
Fabric, wood, stone, glass, ceramics, metal and rhinestones without foil backing.
This is the same formula you may be used to in E-6000, but white.

E-6000 Jewelry and Craft Adhesive Black
Opaque black
Sets in about 10 minutes. Fully cured in 24 to 72 hours.
Fabric, wood, stone, glass, ceramics, metal and rhinestones without foil backing.
This is the same formula you may be used to in E-6000, but black.

E-6000 Shoe Dazzle™
Clear
Sets in about 10 minutes. Fully cured in 24 to 72 hours.
Leather, fabric, vinyl and rhinestones without foil backing.
Designed specifically for use on most shoe materials, allowing you to bling out your heels!

E-6000 Spray Adhesive
Translucent white
1 to 5 hours
Leather, fabric, rubber, foam, vinyl, paper, wood, plastic and metal.
This is odor free and cleans up with warm water.

Epoxy 220
Transparent amber
12 hours at room temperature or 20 minutes under a heat lamp.
Stone, ceramics, metal and cabochons.
This is one of the strongest holds in jewelry adhesives.

Epoxy 330
Clear with a blue tint
1 hour at room temperature or 10 minutes under a heat lamp.
Stone, ceramics, metal and cabochons.
This epoxy is a good choice for bonding gemstones to metal findings.

Super Glue® Future Glue®
Clear
Sets in seconds. Fully cured in 24 hours.
Plastics (except for polyethylene, polypropylene or Teflon), rubber (except certain silicone types), metal, leather, wood and ceramics.
While the best results are on clean and dry surfaces, this glue can bond through dirt and oil.

Super Glue Future Glue Brush-On
Clear
Sets in less than 30 seconds. Fully cured in 24 hours.
Metal, leather, ceramics, plastics (except for polyethylene, polypropylene or Teflon), rubber and wood.
The brush gives control of application; something that’s important when working with fast-drying adhesives.

Super Glue Future Glue Gel
Clear
Sets in less than 30 seconds. Fully cured in 24 hours.
Metal, vinyl, rubber (except for some silicone types), plastics, (except for polyethylene, polypropylene or Teflon), ceramics, wood and leather.
This gel formula doesn’t run or sag, so it works really well on vertical applications.

GORILLA™ Epoxy Impact-Tough™ Formula
Light tan
5 minutes working time. Undisturbed for 90 minutes. Light handling, 24 hours for 100% dry.
Foam, wood, plastic (except polyethylene, polypropylene and Teflon), stone, glass, ceramics and metal.
This water-resistant epoxy has a slight gap-filling quality that can be helpful when working with slightly uneven surfaces.

GORILLA glue
Light tan
3 – 4 hours for light handling. 24 hours for 100% dry.
Foam, wood, plastic (except polyethylene, polypropylene, and Teflon), stone, glass, ceramics, and metal.
This glue is non toxic, acid free, waterproof and stainable/paintable.

Gorilla Glue Precision Pen
White
5 minutes for light handling. 24 hours for 100% dry.
Foam, wood, stone, glass, ceramics, and metal.
This glue expands to 3 to 4 times the surface area you apply–a little goes a long way.

GORILLA Super Glue Impact-Tough Formula
Translucent
30 to 60 seconds
Wood, metal, stone, ceramics and plastic (except polyethylene, polypropylene and Teflon).
Once you apply your pieces they can’t be repositioned, but the fully dried glue can be sanded.

G-S Hypo Cement
Crystal clear
10 minutes
Wood if painted or sealed, plastic, glass, ceramics, metal, rhinestones and cabochons.
This was originally created for watch makers, but the durability of the adhesive and the precision tip make it perfect for jewelry designers too.

G-S Hypo Fabric Cement
Crystal clear
10 minutes
Leather, fabric, paper, balsa wood, plastic and rhinestones without foil backing.
This flexible glue is great for sealing knots and is washable. You can launder fabric that has this glue applied once it has dried for at least 24 hours.

Helmar® Acid-Free Gemstone Glue
Clear
Fast–can vary depending on the climate
Plastic, stone, glass, rhinestones and cabochons.
While the name of this particular product is Acid Free, all Helmar adhesives are acid free and photo safe.

Helmar Clear Silicone Sealant
Clear
Fast–can vary depending on the climate
Rubber, plastic, glass, glazed ceramics and metal.
This is acid free with a neutral cure, so it’s ideal for archival-quality work.

Helmar Super-Tac
Clear and flexible
Fast–can vary depending on the climate
Fabric, paper, wood, plastic, glass, ceramics, metal and rhinestones.
Great for adhering unusual shapes.

Henrietta’s® gum arabic
Clear
Depends on thickness and climate.
Fabric
Use this to make ”needles” on the end of your silk thread.

Hot Glue Stick
Clear
35 to 40 seconds
Leather, fabric, foam, paper, plastics and wood.
This glue will stay clear, as opposed to yellowing.

Jewel Bond™ Glue
Crystal clear
Can be handled in 24 hours.
Fabric, stone, rhinestones and cabochons.
This is made specifically for embellishing fabric. Your fabric can be washed by hand after 5 days of drying.

Loctite® 409 Gel
Crystal clear
Instant bond
Wood, plastic, stone, glass, ceramics, metal and cabochons.
Gap-filling qualities and extended life by refrigeration make this a go-to adhesive.

Loctite 454 Gel
Crystal clear
In seconds
Wood, plastic, stone, glass, ceramics, metal and opaque cabochons.
Fine-tip applicator and gap-filling qualities.

Loctite Prism® 406
Crystal clear
In seconds
Fabric, plastic, glass, metal and cabochons.
The gap-filling properties and the fine-tip applicator are a perfect match for cord ends.

Mod Podge® Gloss-Lustré glue sealer
Clear with a high gloss
Depends on thickness and material applied to.
Paper and fabric.
Is perfect for scrapbooking and can also be used as a sealer.

Paper Bead Girl Adhesive™
Transparent
Very quickly
Paper
This is specifically made to glue and seal paper–give it a try when you’re working with a Paper Bead Roller.

PASCOFix®
Clear
Instantly
Rubber, wood, plastics (except for polyethylene, polypropylene or Tefleon), stone, glass ceramics, metal, rhinestones and cabochons.
One of the strongest instant glues we know of–use only a drop at a time!

Permanent Tape Roller
Clear
Instant
Paper
This is photo safe, so great for scrapbook projects.

Poly Bonder™
Clear
Instant bond
Polymer clays, vinyl, plastics and ceramics.
This is made to withstand baking up to 300-degrees Fahrenheit.

Repositionable tape roller
Clear
Instant
Paper
This can be easily rubbed off, without leaving a residue, to allow for repositioning.

Super Glue® 5-Minute Epoxy
Light yellow
5 minutes to set. Fully cured in 24 hours.
Wood, glass, ceramics, metal and cabochons.
For the best adhesion, roughen smooth surfaces with sand paper before applying the mixed epoxy.

Super Glue® Single-Use
Clear
Instant
Rubber, wood, plastics (except for polyethylene, polypropylene or Teflon), ceramics and metal.
It doesn’t take much; only use about one drop per square inch.

The Ultimate! Adhesive
Crystal clear
24 hours
Leather, fabric, paper, wood, plastic, glass, ceramics and metal.
The flexibility makes it great to use when using fabrics.

Vigor® Super Glue
Clear
15 to 20 seconds
Rubber, plastics, stone, glass, ceramics and metal.
The tiny applicator is very helpful, especially when gluing knots.

Diane Fitzgerald Workshop: November 12, 13, 2011

On Saturday, November 12th and Sunday, November 13th 2011, the Omaha Beady Bunch had the pleasure of hosting a wonderful workshop with Diane Fitzgerald, internationally known beader, writer, and instructor. 

Judy Citta and her committee did all of the hard work to make this dream a reality for our organization.  Here is a photo of Judy just after she introduced Dianne to the participants.

Diane is a prolific author of many books, designer of numerous complete beading kits, DVD’s, and other helpful tools to enhance the skills of beaders all over the world.

Here are examples of her publications and her work:

Beautiful work done with a combination of seed beads and Swaroski crystals.

Due to the protected nature of photographs on Diane’s website, I was unable to post a copy of the photos of items presented in these two workshops.  If you would like to see the Moorish Tiles (Saturday) and Gingko Leaves (Sunday), you can view them on Diane’s site.  Here is her link:

http://www.dianefitzgerald.com/classes.asp

Here are various members hard at work on the Moorish Tile Bead.

Are they all singing “Zippity Do Da?”

Singing Zippity Do Da
The Group with Diane
The Beady Bunch Participants With Diane (Center)
Lisa Preparing to Change The Song To "Dippity Do Da!"
Lisa Changing the Song To Dippity Do Da
One Down.....Only 6 To Go!
A great time was had by all in attendance.  Thanks to our President, Chris Johnson, our Chair, Judy Citta and Diane Fitzgerald, instructor extroidinnaire,  for making this a special week-end of beading, learning, and great fun!

Number of Beads Per 16 Inch Strand

Fire Mountain Gems and Beads

 Number of Beads per 16 inch strand 

**Please note that the number of beads listed below is an estimate only. Number of beads may vary.

Size
Number of Beads
Rounds
2mm
203
3mm
136
4mm
100
6mm
67
8mm
50
10mm
41
12mm
34
Hearts
6mm
90
Thick Hearts
12mm
36
20mm
20
Stars
6mm
70
Twists
8x20mm
20
Lentils
12mm
40
20mm
22
Leaves
14x18mm
20
Shells
18x20mm
20
Triangles
16mm
24
Rice
5x12mm
36
Melons
4x6mm
64
Rondelles
3x5mm
175
Cubes
4x4mm
102
Tubes
3x5mm
80
4x13mm
30
Rectangles
4x13mm
30
Teardrops
6x16mm
25
9x22mm
19 (strung lengthwise)
Donuts
20mm
20
25mm
15
30mm
13
40mm
10
45mm
8
Discs
3x5mm
25
Cylinders
13x4mm
16
Pears
16x7mm
24

  • Email: Questions@firemtn.com
  • Customer Service: (800) 423-2319
  • Order by Phone: (800) 355-2137
  • Order by Fax: (800) 292-3473

Fire Mountain Gems and Beads – One Fire Mountain Way, Grants Pass, OR 97526-2373
Copyright 2011 All rights reserved.

The 5th Annual Edna Perkins Project

5th Annual Edna Perkins Project
When Edna Perkins made a donation of her bead stash to our members in 2007, little did she dream that a project would stem from her genorosity that is now in its 5th year!

Edna, a long time member of the Beady Bunch, had generously donated beads from her growing “stash”.  We determined that something very special should be done with the beads to honor Edna and all that she had done for the Omaha Beady Bunch.

The Edna Perkins Project was born.

This Project has been on going ever since.

Last year, we determined that since Edna is a Veteran of the United States Navy, we would honor Veterans.

It was agreed to again this year since many of our hospitalized Veterans do not have an opportunity to shop for gifts to give to their mothers, wives, and/or significant others. The wonderful jewelry was delivered to the Volunteer Services Department of the Omaha Veterans Administration Hospital for distribution just in time for Mother’s Day gifting.

As in previous years, Joni Stinson, the unelected keeper of the beads, brought the growing stash of donated beads to the February meeting. Members selected the beads that they wished to use. The only rule is that at least part of the beaded piece is made from the donated beads.

Participating members delivered their finished pieces to the April meeting.   This year, the finished pieces went through several hands prior to their being gifted at the VA Hospital.  Pam collected them at the meeting and got them to Joni Stinson.
Joni  arranged and photographed the work.

Then she delivered them to Marilyn Robinson, Treasurer of the Council Bluffs, Iowa Inter-tribal VFW Women’s Auxillary.  Marilyn had graciously offered to present them to the VA Volunteer Services for distribution on behalf of the Omaha Beady Bunch.   

Happy Mother’s Day All!

 

 

Thanks to Edna Perkins, all of the Beady Bunch members who contributed to the success of our 5th annual Edna Perkins Project and to all of our Veterans, past and present, for their services to our great country. God Bless You and the USA!

 

 
 

 

The Quest for the Perfect Lampwork Bead

The current economy seems to have driven many jewelry makers to go for mass produced, imported beads. While they have their place, quality jewelry must start with quality beads.
 
I have become a “cyber friend” of a magnificient lampwork bead artist, Joan Prichard.
 
I asked if she would do a “Guest Artist” article for our organization. I am delighted that she accepted the opportunity to share her knowledge of beads with us.
 
Let me introduce Joan to you. Several of you may be acquainted with her if you subscribe to either Art Jewelry or The Flow magazines. She was featured as one of Flow Magazine’s Women of Glass for 2010 and her work was published in Art Jewelry’s January, 2011 edition.
 

 

Joan Prichard

 

The Quest for the Perfect Lampwork Bead

by Joan Prichard

 
First it’s important to understand the artistic process behind making a quality bead. While there is an abundance of inexpensive beads on the market, be aware that you do tend to get what you pay for.

Some of the more complex beads that have intricate designs, use foils, special reactive glasses or murrini may command a higher price due to the cost of materials as well as the skill level and time involved.

Bracelet by Joan

If you are buying a bead set, check to ensure the beads fit nicely against each other and that they are all basically a uniform size and shape. Often when a lamp worker uses a mold or press to shape the bead, the molten glass meeting the cold surface of the mold can create a pattern of ripples on the surface of the bead called chill marks. An experienced lampwork artist will “heat polish” these marks away with the heat of the flame.

Look for cracks especially around the bead hole, and also make sure the bead is free of nicks and burrs. Jagged edges around the bead hole can fray or even break beading materials. Also check the bead hole to ensure that all bead release has been removed.

Check For Details!

Lampworkers use a coating of bead release on the mandrel. The release keeps the bead from sticking to the mandrel so that it can easily be removed. After the bead is cooled, the lamp worker should remove all traces of bead release. Otherwise, this substance can coat your stringing materials and flake onto clothing.

Evaluate The Comformation

Evaluate the bead’s overall appearance. If it is round is it balanced? Granted, lampwork beads are handcrafted. However, the bead should be pleasing from all sides and the design should be symmetrical.

More experienced lampworkers tend to concentrate more on the finished elements of the bead such as a pleasing shape. Beginning lampworkers are more focused on the overall mechanics of operating the torch and are less focused on the finer details.

Ask if the bead has been annealed. Why is annealing important? The annealing process involves heating a bead in a kiln to a specific temperature and allowing the bead to slowly cool and relieve internal stresses. You are basically changing the internal structure of the glass to improve its durability. Glass beads that have not been annealed are more likely to crack or shatter when subjected to small temperature changes. Therefore, annealing is critical to their durability. It is an important sign of a quality bead that it has been annealed. And if you think about it, a reputable artist who has spent hours making a beautiful bead should want to improve the lifespan and durability of their miniature work of art.

Hopefully these few tips will make your venture into finding the perfect bead less stressful and more productive. No matter if you’re spending a small amount of money or large, you still should pursue quality beads. After all, you not only have money invested, but also your time in creating beautiful jewelry.

About the Artist

Joan Prichard’s love for glass started close to 20 years ago when she took a stained glass class in Columbia, SC. She later became intrigued with glass beads while attending the Glass Craft and Bead Expo in Las Vegas.

A demonstration by a glass artist at the show was her introduction to these delicate works of art and she began her own venture into crafting her own art glass beads. In 2008 she expanded her love for glass to enamels and began creating cloisonné as well as lampwork beads and jewelry. In 2010 she launched her online website for Sand and Surf Beads. Joan lives in Navarre, Florida with her precious kitty Havana.

Her work is published in Art Jewelry Magazines January 2011 Gallery and in The 2010 Flow’s Women in Glass.

Joan, thank you for sharing this information and your lovely work with us. If you would like to see more of Joan’s work, visit her here:

www.sandandsurfbeads.com

A Bit of Tongue in Cheek!

Beads Seized

Beads Seized by FDA at Import Docks Declared Illegal –

Contain Addictive Properties

Dateline Washington DC

In a renewed effort on the War on Drugs and Other Things that Might Be Addictive, the FDA recently seized an import of Japanese beads ranging from Delicas and 11/0s to triangles, 6/0s hex beads and more, claiming that the favorite among bead designers contained chemicals with possible addictive properties.

Spokesman Haam Struhng of the FDA stated “these beads contain something that we have determined to be addictive. Just look at them – once you start with a single color, you instantly feel the need to own them all. Some beaders get so far gone that they must not only have the colors in one bead style, but in ALL bead types!

This is a serious problem and is ruining budgets all over the US, including your town! Last November, the FDA began sending out operatives to various “bead shops” to investigate and to attempt to put a stop to this Menace. However, much of this campaign backfired. Says one former agent who preferred to remain anonymous “come on – if Marcus Amerman, Don Pierce and David Chatt can get so much attention by doing this then why shouldn’t I?”

Many of the female agents sent into the alleged “bead houses” never returned. It also seemed the larger the store, the worse the attrition. One female agent went to investigate a huge store in the San Diego area and was not seen again for three days. When she was finally tracked down she was found in a motel room on the outskirts of Yuma, holding 4 suitcases full of beads. The apparently half-mad woman evaded capture , mocking the Agents by shouting “I’m heading to Tucson with my expense account credit card” After backing up and pointing her vehicle towards the freeway, she rolled down her window and laughed, saying “Calgon’s got nothing on this bead stuff!” as she spun out in her “Liza Lou” Limited Edition Humvee. ”

The seats feel a bit uncomfortable the woman shouted over the roaring engine, “but so what – it’s beads” as she went skidding out of the parking lot, swinging a long hank of 11/0s over her head in a move reminiscent of that by Gina Davis’ character in the hit movie Thelma and Louise”.

This reporter got a glimpse of her bumper sticker “Bring Back Beadwork’s Bead Bash” it read and another said “Give me Embellishment or Give Me Beads”. A third, somewhat more aggressive logo stood out stating “Shut up and Bead”. Clearly, this woman is exhibiting a cry for help.

Several “recovery homes” have been established in some of the more dangerous states – those with a large bead store presence, but have discovered the level of security will need to be high “the beads are tiny” said one veteran Matron “these women think nothing of hiding their contraband beads in skin folds or taping them inside their clothes” she said with a sigh. Tensing up, she stated “visiting day is worst of all – they see these family members come dressed in jewelry and just go nuts.

One whole wing was torn up and someone showed the inmates how to make beads out of coffee grounds. It’s the worst duty I’ve pulled in 25 years in the Federal Prison System”.

Currently, the White House is lobbying to eliminate beads on the Internet, citing them a “a menace to otherwise productive men and women”. and stating “these Internet related peddlers of addictive substances must be stopped at all costs”.

Beaders React to these new Allegations……by laughing out loud!

A New Year’s Treasure

A Treasure For A New Year!

Yesterday I received an e-mail from one of my Beading Heros, Margie Deeb. I thought it was a perfect article to start the New Year.

I enjoyed her message so much that I wrote to her and asked if she objected to my sharing it on my blog and beading club web site.

As always, she responded promptly and consented! So here it is:

Discovering the Treasure in Failure

“Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep.” -Scott Adams

As a creator, I’ve learned a lot about destroying. In order to create, we must destroy. It is a part of the creation process. Destroying makes the space for new creation.

We destroy a hank of beads so that we may order its pieces into a necklace. We destroy old ideas to make way for new. We destroy empty space to fill it with a new painting. We destroy a design that doesn’t work in order to create a new one that, hopefully, works.

I was faced with this last dilemma recently. Off and on, for the past 8 months I’ve been working on an intricate piece. I’d made prototypes out of rope that indicated that my idea would work and I was so excited. However, to see if it actually worked, I had to weave it together. After 60+ hours I realized that what I had created would not work like the vision I had in my mind’s eye. So I had to rip it apart. Did I mention it was 60+ hours of work over 8 months time?

I’ve come to realize that destroying is as much a part of creating as the act of creation. I used to resent having to destroy my failed beadwork, regarding those precious hours spent making it as squandered and meaningless because they lead to failure. I saw it as a waste of time. As I’ve matured, I realize that time is only wasted if I refuse to learn from the errors I filled it with.

When possible I save my beaded failures to refer back to what made them fail. In this case, I’d woven together a costly amount of beads that I needed to un-weave so I could use them. I spent hours pulling apart lovingly crafted rows of weaving.

For the first time in my 20+ years of beading, the destruction process fascinated rather than frustrated me. I felt I was watching portions of my life in rewind. As I unravelled, I relived the hours spent weaving while watching a Frank Zappa concert DVD with my husband. Then came memories of my trip to San Diego as I tore out loops made during the summer. Backwards I wove through the section of rows completed in July when we lost our Greyhound. Then the part I’d made during the last weeks of our Dalmatian’s life in March. I deconstructed the parts that I’d shared over lunch with two bead artist friends at a French restaurant. And finally, the very first rows I’d made (while my head spun with excitement) became shreds of thread and loose homeless beads.

As I ripped, cut, and pulled, I experienced-in the most tactile way-my methods of ensuring my work for posterity. I also cursed them. Overkill here and there, as I sawed apart six and seven passes of thread through one bead.

From this destruction emerged not only the space for my revised design, but also (and this came as a surprise) a more compassionate view of myself. Unwinding months of my life captured in thread and glass offered me a broader perspective of myself. As if watching a film, I saw a woman – in between the mundane and sublime moments of her life, the peaks and valleys, the joys and losses – quietly, methodically building something of beauty. Small and striking. Maybe not a masterpiece, but a creation that would mean something to her, and hopefully to others. I saw someone wanting, from the depth of her heart, to create beauty: beauty that will last and adorn and inspire others to create more beauty. Each fragment of thread and released bead illuminated that part of me that thrives on inspiring beauty, creativity, and excellence in the world.

It was an enlightening time of destruction. And at the end of it I felt wiser, more confident, and more excited about rebuilding my vision in a new way. Not a moment has been wasted!

I do hope that you enjoyed this as much as I did. Should you like to see Margie’s work, sign up for her newsletter, buy her kits or books, take an on-like course, read her blog, please visit her website. Here is the link:

http://www.margiedeeb.com/

Margie, thanks for your continuing support, generosity, and inspiration!  You are one of Beading’s True Treasures!

Did You Know

 

Lisa Dryden received this information from the 5Z’s store in Lincoln.

BEAD BITS:

THIS to THAT; THAT to THIS

You know how to do the Peyote Stitch BUT the pattern you want to make in Brick Stitch. What do you do then?
OR
You know how to do the Herringbone Stitch BUT the pattern you want to do is
Square Stitch OR Loom Stitch. What do you do then?
For a Brick Stitch pattern, all you have to do is turn it on its side and work
it in Peyote Stitch! The same holds true if you like doing Brick Stitch and you
have a Peyote Stitch pattern. Turn it on its side and work it in Brick Stitch.

For a Square Stitch/Loom Stitch pattern, you can work it in the Herringbone
Stitch as long as there are an even number of beads in the base rose. (There is
a way of working an odd number of beads in the base row: either eliminate one
bead OR add a bead between the two beads added in each Herringbone Stitch!)

 
Lisa Dryden

Caring For Stones

 21white-buffaloFire Mountain Gems and Beads

Favorite Bead and Gemstone

Cleaning Chart 

Cleaning Gemstones
Gemstone
Toughness
Mohs Hardness
Steaming
Ultrasonic
Boiling
Soap
Untreated Cloth
Alexandrite
Excellent
8-1/2
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Amazonite
Poor
6 – 6 1/2
Never
Never
Never
Safe
Yes
Amber
Poor
2 – 2 1/2
No
No
No
Warm soapy water is safe. Do not use a brush because it may leave scratches.
Yes
Amethyst
Good
7
Risky
Usually Safe
No
Yes
Yes
Apatite
Fair
5
Never
Risky
Never
Safe
Yes
Aquamarine
Good
7 1/2 – 8
Usually Safe
Usually Safe
No
Yes
Yes
Aragonite
Fair – Poor
3 1/2 – 4
Never
Never
Never
Usually Safe
Yes
Calcite
Fair – Poor
3
Never
Risky
No
Cool soapy water is safe
Yes
Carnelian
Good
7
No
Usually Safe
No
Yes
Yes
Citrine
Good
7
No
Usually Safe
No
Yes
Yes
Coral
Fair
3 1/2 – 4
Risky
Risky
No
Yes
Yes
Cubic Zirconia (CZ)
Good
8-1/2
Safe
Safe
Safe
Safe
Yes
Diamond
Good
10
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Diopside
Poor
5 1/2 – 6
Never
Risky
No
Safe
Yes
Emerald
Poor – Good
7 1/2 – 8
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Fluorite
Poor
4
Never
Never
Never
Safe
Yes
Garnet
Good
7 – 7 1/2
No
Usually Safe
No
Yes
Yes
Howlite
Fair
3 – 3 1/2
Risky
Risky
Never
Safe
Yes
Iolite
Fair
7 – 7 1/2
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Jade, Jadeite
Exceptional
6 1/2 – 7
Safe
Safe
Safe
Safe
Yes
Jade, Nephrite
Exceptional
6 – 6 1/2
Safe
Safe
Safe
Safe
Yes
Kyanite
Poor
4 – 7 1/2
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Labradorite
Poor
6 – 6 1/2
Never
Never
Never
Safe
Yes
Lapis Lazuli
Fair
5 – 6
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Malachite
Poor
3 1/2 – 4
No
No
No
Safe
Yes
Moonstone
Poor
6 – 6 1/2
Never
Never
Never
Safe
Yes
New ”Jade”
Poor
2 1/2 – 6
Risky
Never
No
Safe
Yes
Olive ”Jade”
Poor
2 1/2 – 6
Risky
Never
No
Safe
Yes
Opal
Poor
5 – 6 1/2
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Pearl
Poor
2 1/2 – 4
No
No
No
No
Yes
Peridot
Poor
6 1/2 – 7
No
No
No
No
Yes
Rainbow Moonstone
Poor
6 – 6 1/2
Never
Never
Never
Safe
Yes
Rhodochrosite
Poor
3 1/2 – 4 1/2
No
No
No
Cool Soapy Water
Yes
Rhodonite
Poor – Good
5 1/2 – 6 1/2
Safe
Usually Safe
No
Warm Soapy Water
Yes
Ruby
Excellent
9
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Sapphire
Excellent
9
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Serpentine
Poor
2 1/2 – 6
Risky
Never
No
Safe
Yes
Shell
Fair
3 1/2
Risky
Risky
Risky
Safe
Yes
Sodalite
Poor
5 – 6
Risky
Never
Never
Safe
Yes
Spinel
Good
8
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Sunstone
Poor
6 – 6 1/2
Never
Never
Never
Safe
Yes
Tanzanite
Poor
6-7
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Topaz
Poor
8
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Tourmaline
Fair
7 – 7 1/2
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Turquoise
Poor – Good
5 – 6
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
 
Zircon
Poor – Fair
6 – 7 1/2
No
No
No
Yes
Yes